| site nav ASAFB
  • Granite
  • Marble
  • Limestone
  • Soapstone
  • Sandstone
  • Travertine
  • Slate
  • Onyx
  • Brick

Soapstone Formation and Uses

Soapstone is a metamorphic rock formed in tectonic zones. Soapstone is primarily composed of the soft mineral talc which results in the soapy feel of the rock (hence the name). Although soapstone is a soft material it is also very dense. One of the most significant properties soapstone is it's natural resistance to acidic environments and is used very frequently in lab environments because of this. Soapstone will draw in any liquid applied to it, and mineral oils (which darkens the stone with each application) are applied in order to achieve a good seal against stains. Even though soapstone scratches easily, it is fairly easy to fix with light sanding. This type of material is most frequently used in kitchens and in laboratories where the "patina" of use is not unwelcome.

Soapstone Sample Images

All sample images listed in this site are for reference purposes only as natural materials can vary in coloration, veining, and pattern type. Please note that individual monitor settings may also affect the coloration & contrast of sample images.

BEFORE APPLYING MINERAL OIL

AFTER ONE APPLICATION OF MINERAL OIL


Using mineral oil to seal soapstone will darken the base color of soapstone dramatically. Several applications of mineral oil will darken the stone even more. Soapstone will need to be re-sealed fairly frequently to begin with and may need more than one application per year to keep it sealed properly.

IMPORTANT NOTE: STONE SEALANTS SHOULD NOT BE USED ON SOAPSTONE MATERIALS AS THEY WILL SINK INTO THE STONE TOO QUICKLY, PROVIDE AN INADEQUATE SEAL AGAINST STAINS AND BACTERIA, AND DISALLOW MINERAL OIL FROM ABSORBING INTO THE STONE PROPERLY. IT IS ESSENTIAL TO ONLY USE MINERAL OIL ON SOAPSTONE FOR SEALING PURPOSES.

Ad Exchange